The Cairo, Washington D.C.
Nov. 23Rd 1895

W. Gordon McCabe Esq.

My Dear Mr. McCabe,

Thanks for your letter of the
21st inst. which has just been received. I will
at once give the matter the best attention I can.
I am deeply impressed with the importance of
having the new appointments on the University
Board, of the very best material. We have reached
a critical period in the history of the University
The future of the institution depends on the ability,
courage, judgment, and taste of the management
more than ever before. In addition to the dry
rot, which, for years, has been retarding growth
and development, the recent catastrophe brings
financial problems, and questions as to character,
cost and location of new buildings--and along
with all else, in the reconstruction and rearrangement
of matters, an eye should be had to an enlarged and
modernized course of instruction adapted to the
wants of our times and our civilization. We
always have too many lawyers and public men

on the board. We need, of course, some lawyers
and some doctors, but can find abundant utility
in some non-professional members, of business or
financial experience. Above all, we need some
scholars, and professional educators. You have
been invaluable on that line, and, with the experi-
ence you have and your devotion to the University
, I would consider your retirement now a
serious loss to the institution and the state. In re-
tiring from the board, I will lose no interest
in the wellfare [sic] of the University, and will, at
once put my wits to work on the line of my original
suggestion to you, finding a personal pleasure
in it, and feeling sure I can in no other way
serve so well the institution which has been and
should always be the pride of the state.

Yours very truly

Thomas S. Martin