Women at the University of Virginia Women at UVa
Introduction
Virginia Gentlewomen
The First Students
Coordinate College
Graduate and Professional Schools
Women and University Life
breaking Tradition
Coeducation
Timeline
Timeline, page 1
Timeline, page 2
Resources
Share Your Story


Timeline

Part 2

Timeline of Women at U.Va., continued

1967
President Edgar F. Shannon, Jr. appoints a University committee to consider the need for the admission of women to the College of Arts and Sciences.

1968
The committee concludes that the existing arrangement "unfairly discriminates against women" and comes out in support of their admittance.

1969
The committee finds that U.Va. is the only U.S. state university that, by not opening its main campus college to women, forces them to attend a separate college 65 miles away. The Honor Committee, however, concludes in a study that "coeducation will hurt the Honor System, and thus should not be recommended." The Board of Visitors drops its ban against women in the College. U.Va. adopts a policy of voluntary "gradualism," and declares, as a first step, that it will accept student and faculty members' wives and daughters.

1969-70
U.Va. alumnus John Lowe initiates ACLU lawsuit against U.Va. U.S. Circuit Court panel requires U.Va. to consider the application of Virginia Scott and to phase in coeducation over two years.

1970
The first class of 450 undergraduate women enters U.Va. (39 percent). The number of men admitted remains constant.

2003
Women comprise 55 percent of the undergraduate student body.

 

Sources include: Alumni News, Office of Admissions, Women's Center

 

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