Go to Section or Dept. Name home
Small Special Collections Library, UVa

Hours: click to view hours

Phone: (434) 243-1776 | Fax:(434) 924-4968

Home | Reference Request | Class Request | Where We Are | Staff Directory

 

The Cabell Family Papers

Papers of the Joseph Carrington Cabell Family: MSS 38-111c


Scope and Contents: These papers consist primarily of the correspondence of Joseph Carrington Cabell and other Cabell and other allied family members, ca. 1783-1887, ca. 4,200 items (12 Hollinger boxes, 5 linear feet). Among the correspondents are the Reverend George Bush, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell, Elizabeth Nicholas Cabell, Nathaniel Francis Cabell, Philip Barraud Cabell, Sally F. Cabell, William H. Cabell, John Coalter, Cary Charles Cocke, John Hartwell Cocke, Lucy Oliver Cocke, Philip St. George Cocke, Isaac A. Coles, the Reverend Richard De Charms, Isaac Read, Judge Francis Nathaniel Watkins, and others.

Also included are some legal and financial papers and correspondence of the Bolling family, and some relating to the James River and Kanawha Canal Company. Other legal and financial papers include papers concerning the estates of William Newburn, Sarah R. Newburn and William C.R. Newburn, with William Bolling Executor, and James Lownes.

Other papers present in the collection include news clippings, with a separate folder of ones devoted to Professor George Bush (1796-1859) of the New Jerusalem Church; manuscripts by Nathaniel Francis Cabell; poetry; school reports of Sallie F. Cabell and Fannie G Cabell; and a copy of a draft of a report, in an unknown hand, on the First Battle of Bull Run, originally submitted by Philip St. George Cocke to General Beauregard. For a full copy of this report by Cocke to Beauregard, please see the Cocke Family Papers, #640, Box 165, dated August 3, 1861.

Summaries of the content of each group of correspondence follows immediately in the guide, in the order of their appearance in the folder listing, beginning with the first series consisting of correspondence to and from Joseph C. Cabell.

Series I: Correspondence of Joseph C. Cabell
The correspondence from Edward Carrington Cabell to Joseph C. Cabell is chiefly concerned with his father’s health and an invitation to his uncle to visit him.
Hannah Carrington Cabell writes to her son, Joseph and his new wife, Mary (also called "Polly") at the beginning of their marriage in 1807, chiefly about domestic news and concerns, including discussions of household furnishings, weaving wool, and other household and clothing needs. Hannah Cabell resided at "Harewood" following the death of her husband and daughter to care for her granddaughters. She often refers to the poor health of Dr. Hare and other family members.
Hannah Cabell also refers to a slave sale from the estate of Samuel [Wenfrey?] (1808 Oct 23 and Nov 3); the poor health of her son and his brother, Nicholas (1808 Dec 28; 1809 Jun 17); arrangements made for the summer clothes of the slaves and work on Joseph’s house waiting for the arrival of the carpenter (1810 Jun 19); her purchase of one slave boy eleven years old (1811 Feb 12); a slave, John, who ran away after being punished with a switch by his master (1812 Mar 29); her trip to Warm Springs and White Sulphur Springs (1812 Aug 11); brief references to the War of 1812, including "our late and glorious victories," perhaps on Lake Erie (1813 Oct 3) and the peace negotiations (1815 Mar 5); requests for four or five dozen bottles of port wine for the health of Dr. Hare (1816 Mar 1); the runaway slave of Dr. Hare, [Leroy?], son of Toby at "Bon Aire" (1816 Jun 23); request to Joseph to attend a slave auction in Richmond for her on January 2nd to purchase a lad of fifteen or sixteen, able to handle a plow (1816 Dec 16 and 30); and the death of the wife of General John Hartwell Cocke, Ann Blaws (1817 Jan 26).
The correspondence of Dr. John Grattan Cabell (1817-1896) is chiefly concerned with business conducted for his uncle but also mentions a cholera epidemic at Richmond (1854 July 13); and the death of his wife, Sarah Marshal Tankersley, leaving him with a daughter, Sarah Elizabeth Cabell (1855 Apr 7).
The correspondence of Joseph C. Cabell to John H. Cocke, 1810-1848 (5 folders), reveals many details of this deep and long-lasting friendship between these two men, including much personal news, details of their agricultural pursuits, and requests for help or advice. There are few references to his work with the University of Virginia, except general mentions of the meetings of the Board of Visitors. There is also little political content, except for references to his interest in internal improvements and the James River and Kanawha Canal Company.
Occasionally, there are a few letters to or from the wives of the two men in these folders and they have been kept with the letters of their husbands. These include one from Joseph C. Cabell to Anne B. Cocke, wife of John H. Cocke (1810 Aug 5), and several letters from Mary W. Cabell to the Cockes (November 11 and December 17, 1816).
Among the topics in the letters from the first folder from Cabell to Cocke are: discussion of the Corotoman Plantation, Lancaster County, Virginia, and the settlement of the Estate (1811 Jan 11; 1812 Sep 20, Nov 16, Dec 15 and 16; 1813 Jan 16); the names and prices of slaves from Corotoman Plantation sold for "incorrigible conduct" (1813 Jan 5); his support for Colonel James Monroe in the next race for governor (1811 Jan 11); agricultural improvements and his plans to introduce the "Albemarle system" at Edgewood, Nelson County, Virginia (1811 Jun 3); seeks advice about hiring a new overseer (1814 Aug 8); news of the reappearing of the enemy in the Chesapeake Bay (1814 Nov 3); the Howard’s Land scheme (1815 Jul 3 and 11); requests for Cocke’s assistance in the selection of new slaves, fearing the "hardiness of the lowland Negroes" (1816 Jun 10); mention of a runaway slave, named Abraham, originally from Corotoman (1816 Aug 22); the deteriorating health of Ann B. Cocke (1816 Dec 20 and 26) her death (1817 Jan 2); and his plans to build an enclosure for the graveyard (1819 Jun 26).
Topics in the second folder to Cocke include: recommendation of Millwrights Guide by Oliver Evans (1820 Aug 23); requests that Cocke’s man, Peter, initiate Cabell’s slave Quintilian "into the arcana of his shop, he has a great desire to advance himself in his beloved art" and mentions another slave, Will, from Corotoman who has come up to see the mountains and "to be cured of the habit of running away." He also mentions improvements in his barn designed by the machinist Andrew Duncan and Cocke’s upcoming marriage to Louisa Maxwell Holmes (all of the above in letter, 1821 Jun 9).
Many of his letters in 1821 and 1822 discuss his unhappiness with his current overseer, whose mismanagement has already cost him a good deal, his attempts to hire a new overseer, and his despair that the machinist Duncan will ever complete his work at Cabell’s farm (1821 Jul 8, 29; Aug 10; Sep 16; Nov 22; 1822 Sep 6-7; Oct 24 and 31). Cabell also praises the superior work of Cato, a slave belonging to J.H. Cocke, on his mill (1822 Aug 24). Other topics include his brother’s financial difficulties (1821 Sep 21, Oct 4); and the destruction by fire of one of his barns with 200 barrels of corn at Corotoman (1822 Mar 13).
He expresses his concern over the possible loss of his farm book for 1822, his accounts of his expenditures for his mill and barn, and his last settlement with Duncan (1823 Jul 9) and his gladness that he purchased "Midway" despite the opposition of his family (1824 Jun 15). He discusses his improvements at "Edgewood" and skilled slave laborers carrying out the work (1825 Jul 22, 26; Aug 6); the death of Edmund Harrison of Amelia County (1826 Feb 5); and praise for John Cocke, son of John Hartwell Cocke (1825 Jul 22).
In the third folder to Cocke, Cabell discusses the progress on and hopes for the James River and Kanawha Canal (1824 Aug 15, 22, 28; Sep 23; 1826 Oct 15) and Claudius Crozet in reference to the Canal (1824 Jun 20 and Nov 8; 1826 Sep 2). He also feels the pressure of trying to sell the land belonging to his brother George (1826 Sep 2). He also describes his religious practice (1828 Aug 21) and his preparations for the construction of his ice house (1828 Oct 27). Cabell refers to the meeting of the Board of Public Works in Richmond and the discussion of the [Internal Improvement?] Convention Question in the House of Delegates, which he fears will not result in any extension of internal improvements (1829 Jan 10). He includes a detailed discussion of several types of wheat harvesting machines, their designs and merits (1829 Dec 15).
The fourth and fifth folders of correspondence to Cocke contain several references to his interests in the James River and Kanawha Canal Company. Among these are: the delay in opening up the stock subscription until the August Court (1832 Aug 7); the meeting of the stockholders (1835 May 15); the visit of the committee composed of members of both houses in the Virginia Legislature investigating the affairs of the company (1843 Jan 25); descriptions of damages to the canal and other matters concerning its operation (1843 Apr 19; 1844 Jan 25, Mar 28); a discussion of the desire of Governor McDowell to transfer the James River and Kanawha Canal Company and its works to the state (1843 Nov 10); and the strong railroad interests acting against the James River and Kanawha Canal Company (1847 Dec 5).
Other topics in these two folders to Cocke include: the death of "our dear beloved child" at the Sweet Springs on October 12, 1839, and its devastating effects upon the Cabells (1839 Oct 18); the death of the second Mrs. Cocke, Louisa Maxwell Holmes Cocke (1843 Jun 9); an extract from a report of engineer Edward Miller on the "Improvement of the Schuylkill Navigation" (1845 May 5); temperance (1845 Jul 20); and the damage from hailstones on his two upper farms at "Midway" (1848 Jul 17). This completes the summary of letters in the first box.
The first two folders in the second box contain letters from Joseph C. Cabell to Isaac A. Coles of "Green Mountain," Albemarle County, and secretary to President Thomas Jefferson, chiefly pressing Coles to visit. Other topics include an attempt to procure wine from Coles for his brother and Mr. Wirt (1807 Jul 26); and Cabell asking Coles about the condition of affairs with England, telling him not to purchase a gig for him, if war is coming (1807 Nov 18 and 1808 Sep 21). Also present is one letter from William H. Cabell to John Coles concerning the health of his son, Isaac Coles (1804 Sep 30) and one letter from Charles J. Cabell seeking a government position (1808 Oct 28).
The second group of letters to Coles give advice to him concerning his courtship of a Miss Brown in Williamsburg (1810 Nov 29, Dec 21; 1811 Jan 14); the political attack upon Cabell at the Capitol by his enemies (1813 Mar 21); and references to the military service of Coles on the Canadian frontier (1813 Jun 27; 1816 Oct 19).
There are two folders of notes and letters from Joseph C. Cabell to his nephew, Nathaniel Francis Cabell, which includes one note from Peggy R. Cabell. These are chiefly miscellaneous notes requesting N.F. Cabell to copy documents, perform many different tasks, and giving him proxy instructions and other directions. Specific topics include the death of cousin Mayo Cabell’s daughter, Eliza (1849 May 10); dissatisfaction with the behavior of his slaves (1851 Jan 1); another reference to slaves (1851 Jan 1); a discussion of the upkeep of the road from Warminster to Rockfish (1851 Aug 29); and in two notes with no year given, an apparent list of slave names (n.y. Feb 8) and list of damages to his crops from Frank’s bull (n.y. Aug 12).
In the folder of correspondence from Joseph C. Cabell to his parents and brother, George, he chiefly discusses his trip to South Carolina (1801 Dec-1802 Mar 19); a trip to the Warm Springs (1802 Jun 23); the death of his sister, Betsy (1802 Dec 11) and his wait at Norfolk, Virginia, for a ship to France (1802 Dec 11 and 23).
His letters to Judge St. George Tucker (1807-1819) all concern the management of the Corotoman estate. The Corotoman estate is also a topic in the letters of Joseph C. Cabell to William Wirt (1823 Mar 15), among other business matters. The letters of Landon Cabell all concern business matters involving both himself and Joseph C. Cabell.
Dr. Robert G. Cabell’s letters contain family news and medical advice, particularly for Oscar, [a slave?] (1842 May 26) and a report on the medical condition of a slave named Moses, who was examined by Dr. Cabell (1847 Dec 20).
The remainder of the folders in Box 2 contain letters from William H. Cabell to his brother, Joseph H. Cabell. From 1803 until May 1806, Joseph C. Cabell is traveling in Europe. Folder one of the correspondence from William H. Cabell to Joseph Cabell contains the following topics: the death of their sister, Elizabeth Cabell Hare (1802 Dec 7); references to renewed war between France and England and details about the death of their father (1803 Aug 23); details regarding the murder of Doctor James Hopkins (1803 Dec 10); political news in Virginia (1803 Dec 10); reference to the trial of Aaron Burr drawing to a close (1807 Oct 19); a warning for Joseph not to move to Corotoman (1807 Nov 19, 21); William’s eagerness to leave the position of governor (1807 Dec 1); William’s wish to call on Thomas Jefferson while he is at Monticello on his return to Richmond (1808 Jul 26); and his request for any of the Corotoman "gang" male slaves, and instructions to Joseph to send "old Sam" as his wife is at "Repton" (1808 Oct).
Topics in the second folder of correspondence from William to Joseph Cabell include: William’s desire to acquire two slaves "old Fanny" from Captain Carrington and "old Sam" from his brother, Joseph (1810 Jan 9); a discussion of the court and legal system in Virginia and the practice of runaway slaves who arm themselves and collect in groups to form camps underground or in caves (1810 Dec 31); and a discussion about whether Joseph should go into the ranks of the military near the beginning of the War of 1812, where William advises him to secure a substitute and also not to take a professorship (1812 Jun 15, 22, 28).
Topics in the third folder of correspondence from William to Joseph Cabell includes: an opinion that the greatest danger from the British forces lies on the water not on land (1813 Mar 26); a rumor about Napoleon Bonaparte that he read in the Charleston Gazette (1814 Jun 2); advice about the slaves at Corotoman (1814 Jul 7); difficulties of William with his son, Nicholas, and a request for Joseph to advise Nicholas from his relationship as his uncle (1814 Sep 27; 1815 Jun 6; 1816 Apr 25); a discussion about the settlement of the Corotoman estate, including a letter from Joseph to William (1815 Oct 12 and 15); the sale of a slave, Becky, by the mother of William and Joseph (1817 Jul 12) and the death of Dr. William B. Hare at Harewood (1818 Jun 28).
The topics in the fourth folder of correspondence from William to Joseph Cabell include: a memorandum of slaves conveyed by W.C. Nicholas in trust for the benefit of William H. Cabell with their ages and other notes, as of the summer of 1819 (see the letter dated 1820 Oct 22); request to allow a slave called Johnson, the son of Grace, who was the cook for William to be sent to Joseph for training as a cook (1821 Aug 12); the death of William’s son, Nicholas (1821 Oct 13); concern for the health of his son, Abraham Cabell (1821 Oct 21 and Nov 30); a reference to the argument between the Governor [Thomas Mann Randolph] and his Council, and a description of the Governor as "a high minded, independent and honorable man; but greatly deficient in good sense and discretion" (1821 Dec 20).
The topics in the fifth folder of correspondence from William to Joseph Cabell, which begins Box 3, include: his commiseration over their choice of bad overseers (1822 Jun 10); his concern over the initial disappearance of Robert Wirt, Abram Cabell’s discovery of young Wirt at Lynchburg, Wirt’s plan to go to the Western country to settle, and the last sighting of Wirt at the Giles Courthouse in Virginia (1822 Aug 15, 18, and Sep 8).
The sixth folder of their correspondence includes a recommendation for Colonel [Robert?] Gamble to be appointed Principal Engineer to the State by William H. Cabell (1823 Mar 28). Folder seven contains a note about sending up one of Abram Cabell’s slaves, Judy, daughter of "Isbel" who lived on the plantation of Joseph Cabell (1825 Jun 21). Much of folder eight is taken up with discussions about the attempts of Abram Cabell to sell his land and the slave claim of Joseph Cabell (1827-1828). William also writes his advice to Joseph to sell "Midway" (1828 Aug 6); Henry Carrington and Abram Cabell have set off for Florida (1829 Apr 16); and his reason for keeping Robert [Gamble Cabell] at home was to allow "the commotion at college to subside" (1829 Apr 23).
Folder nine of correspondence from William to Joseph Cabell includes: a discussion of the terms of the will of Mrs. Tucker, drawn up by William (1835 May 31) and a discussion about the guardianship accounts of Miss Carter, kept by Joseph Cabell (1836 Apr 6). The tenth and last folder contains several letters, including one from Colonel Robert Gamble, about a serious illness of William (1840 Aug 28, Sep 9, and Nov 11).
Dr. George Callaway writes chiefly of business matters, including one letter from William Massie to himself, but also expresses concern over the death of Nicholas Cabell (1821 Oct 27).
Mathew Carey (1760-1839), Philadelphia publisher, asks if Joseph knows anyone who can help him distribute some pamphlets expressing his views on tariffs and protectionism (1829 Dec 14); describes his life and habits (1830 Jan 4); and remarks upon the "menacing state of affairs in South Carolina" stating that "The crisis demands all the energies of the friends of the human race. If we escape this danger, the union may be safe for half a century. But a little remissness may make shipwreck of all our hopes" (1830 Jul 22).
There are three folders of letters from Judge John Coalter (1769-1838) to Joseph Cabell, including two letters from St. George Coalter (1838-1839). Topics include: an offer of Coalter’s brother to buy Cabell’s slaves for a sugar plantation in New Orleans (1812 Sep 6); a warning not to sell Corotoman or its slaves in unsettled times of war (1814 Jun 27); the death of Susan, wife of Dr. George Cabell (1817 Jul 14); a mention of his nomination for Judge in the Court of Appeals (18[2?]0 Jan 14); his return from the wilderness, where he has built a "waterworks for washing out gold" (1830 Sep 22, Oct 14); nullification (1831 Aug 1); and a request for information about a proposed turnpike or railroad from the north branch of the Rappahannock to the Potomac (1832 Jan 30 and Mar 15; 1833 Apr 13; and 1834 Jan 20).
Box 4 contains nine folders of correspondence from John Hartwell Cocke to Joseph Cabell, including three letters from Ann Blaws Cocke to Mary Cabell (1809 Dec 29; 1810 Feb 13 and Apr 4). These letters are full of personal news of family and friends, business affairs, discussions about agricultural practices, and advice.
Topics in the first three folders include: Merino sheep (1809 Jan 20); the confirmation of both William H. Cabell and John Coalter on the Court of Appeals (1811 Dec 10); the vote on the nomination of John Hartwell Cocke to the rank of Brigadier General ([ca. 1814]); notice that Cocke had been called into military service, his belief that an attack on Washington was imminent, and his estimate of the resources of the British available for such an attack (1814 Aug 23); the overthrow of Napoleon Bonaparte in France (1815 Aug 18); work on the Bremo house and its cornerstone laid (1816 Jul 18 and 1818 Jul 8); Cocke considered for the Board of Public Works (1818 Feb 16); a late snow upon the Blue Ridge Mountains (1818 May 4); a list of Cocke’s innovative agricultural practices (1818 Jul 8); and a letter of Wilson J. Cary about his carpenter to Cocke, who forwarded it to Cabell (1818 Oct 19).
Topics in the fourth folder of correspondence from John Hartwell Cocke to Joseph Cabell include: religious counsel, which Cocke promises to send annually, the extremely cold weather, and his disinterest in serving as president of the Agricultural Society of Virginia, which he fears is becoming a "hot bed for hatching politics" (1820 Jan 17); river improvements and the success of his threshing machine (1820 Aug 1); discussion of other machinery and an earthquake (1820 Sep 1); the school at Bremo, full and doing well with Mr. [Cavadalli?] as its teacher (1820 Aug 1 and Sep 15); Cocke’s pursuit of his second wife, Louisa Maxwell, in Norfolk (1821 Jun 6 and 23; Aug 13); advice to Cabell to sell Corotoman (1822 Mar 18); concern over the financial habits of his son, John, while a student (1822 May 13); and the death of Wilson Cary at Carysbrook (1823 Sep 12).
Topics in the fifth folder of correspondence from John Hartwell Cocke to Joseph Cabell include: his desire for Cabell to study the canal policy (1824 Feb 16 and Aug 5); mention of the work of Claudius Crozet and Cocke’s disappointment with his mechanic Duncan (1824 Jun 19 and Nov 20); Cocke’s interest in the Colonization Society (1825 Jul 19); and two letters from John Hartwell Cocke, Jr. in his father’s absence (1829 Aug 19 and 31).
Topics in the sixth folder include: reference to the scandalous split between Cabinet members supporting either President Jackson or John Calhoun (1831 Mar 11); description of a local religious revival (1831 May 17); visit to Philadelphia with his family (1834 Jun 24); and a letter from John H. Cocke, Jr. about his father’s plans to return home (1834 Jul 28).
Topics in the seventh folder of correspondence from John Hartwell Cocke to Joseph Cabell include: Sim’s mill and the canal and concern over errors in its construction (1840 Jul 24 and 27); praise for Cabell’s 7th Annual Report about the James River and Kanawha Company (1842 Jan 20); the temperance movement (1842 May 25); religious counsel (1844 May 25); and his trip to Greene County, Alabama (1844 Dec 31).
Topics in the eighth folder include: advice to the Cabells to send all their slaves to Liberia and free themselves from the worries of being a slave owner (1846 Feb 11); Cocke convinced more than ever that the causes of agricultural ruin lie in the multiplication of slavery and the cultivation of tobacco (1846 Apr 27 and 1849 Sep 20); Cocke’s low opinion of Swedenborgianism (1847 Jan 21 and Feb 12); disappointment with the inaction of the Virginia General Assembly on the issue of internal improvements, particularly the extension of the canal (1847 Feb 12); Cocke’s advice for Cabell to carefully train his most intelligent slave as a miller (1847 Jun 17); Cocke’s opposition to the "railroad schemes" of Farland Lyons & Company to supersede the progress of the James River & Kanawha Canal Company with their own interests and his summary of the railroad meeting in Richmond (1847 Dec 3); the success of Mr. Hill’s rotary fish trap (1848 Apr 14 and 26); the death of Mr. Brent (1848 Jun 6); the construction of Cocke’s Fountain Temple, its completion and dedication (1848 Jul 20 and 1849 Sep 20); news and discussion of the temperance movement (1848 Jul 20, Aug 30 and 31; and 1848 Sep 8); and a letter from Mr. E.T. Bryan, forwarded to Cabell, also discussing temperance (1848 Sep 8).
Topics in the last and ninth folder of correspondence from John Hartwell Cocke to Joseph Cabell include: winter in Greene County, Alabama and Remington’s Aerial Bridge construction (1850 Jan 12); Cocke’s controversy with the James River & Kanawha Canal Company (1850 May 1); his request for Cabell to attend the meetings of the James River & Kanawha Canal Company stockholders (1851 Oct 20 and Nov 10; 1852 Oct 7; 1853 Oct 8); the evil effects of growing tobacco on Virginia soil, calling it the "bane of Virginia husbandry" (1852 Mar 15; 1853 Aug 13; and 1854 Mar 3); and a letter from Dr. John Augustine Smith, a fellow student with Cabell and Cocke at William and Mary, February 24, 1853 (enclosed with 1853 Apr 3).
The topics in the two folders of correspondence from Isaac A. Coles to Joseph Cabell include: a severe storm at sea near Richmond, Virginia (1802 Jan 23); description of Coles travel and experiences in France (1804 Jul 15); discussion of the prospects for war and his own future (1808 Apr 3); request that Cabell secure for him portraits of Cabell’s brother and William Wirt by Charles Balthazar Julien Fevret de Saint-Memin (1808 Nov 28); Mr. Lee and his consulship at Bordeaux (1809 Nov 12); Coles’ feud with Roger Nelson, whom he slapped in the Capitol building (1809 Dec 9); request to purchase some slaves from Corotoman from Cabell (1810 Feb 25); notes that Thomas Jefferson has been called away to Bedford unexpectedly (1811 Feb 12); Coles return to Washington as an officer (1812 Jan 27); reference to the financial ruin of Colonel Nicholas (1819 Aug 8); plans to travel to the Eastern Shore and Lake Drummond, with his wife (1823 Apr 22); and a cholera epidemic in Norfolk, Virginia (1832 Aug 11).
Individual folders of correspondence to Joseph C. Cabell continue in Box 5. Topics mentioned in the correspondence of Mayo Cabell to Joseph Cabell include agriculture and the condition of the canal and locks (1847 May 18). Malcolm F. Crawford of Charlottesville writes of his unsuccessful attempts to secure a workman for Joseph Cabell. William J. Lewis, a delegate and representative from Virginia, writes to Cabell of business matters and forwards copies of government documents.
Topics of note in the correspondence from Thomas S. McLelland to Joseph Cabell include: two named slave girls, Judy and Mary, belonging to Joseph Cabell and loaned to McLelland for nursing duties (1815 Apr 16); and the death of William Cabell, Jr. (1819 Jun 28). Robert Rives corresponds about the sale of Cabell’s wheat and other agricultural matters.
There are a number of letters from Henry St. George Tucker to Joseph Cabell. Topics mentioned in these include: the honors bestowed upon George Washington, whose virtues outshone all of his faults, a speech by Henry Lee, the Virginia Resolutions from the pen of James Madison, a delegate in the Virginia General Assembly, and a law altering the mode of election (1800 Feb 1); controversy over the statue of Lord Botetourt and other news of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia (1801 Aug 8); success in getting his law license and news of politics in Williamsburg (1802 May 7); Tucker’s impressions of Winchester, Virginia and the death of Lilly Byrd (1802 Aug 26); Tucker’s declaration of himself as a candidate for the General Assembly (1807 Apr 2); death of Mrs. Tucker, mother of correspondent (1837 Sep 8 and 26); and work and living arrangements for two slaves, Charles and Nancy (1838 May 9).
Letters from Charles Yancey to Joseph Cabell are chiefly concerned with social invitations and agricultural business.
The remainder of the correspondents to Joseph Cabell are individuals with fewer letters who are grouped in the Miscellaneous Correspondents alphabetical folders. These correspondents are all noted in the folder listing and only those with topics of particular note are included in these scope and content notes. Among these topics are: desire to discuss the improvement of the James River navigation (Randolph Harrison, 1819 Mar 23); revising the proof sheets of the pamphlet by Joseph Cabell (James E. Heath, 1831 Aug 8); description of the action taken by the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate on the amendment to the James River Bill (William C. Holt, 1823 Feb 25); and details about a plaster mill (Charles F. Mercer, 1820 Sep 6).
Additional topics in the Miscellaneous Correspondents include: discussion about printing and circulating some letters of James Madison (Hugh Mercer, 1829 Mar 4); discussion of the judicial system of Virginia (Charles L. Mosby, 1850 Aug 10); the death of a slave, Oscar (T. Oldham, 1849 Nov 24); description of a hemp and flax breaking machine (James Pleasants, 1822 Apr 1); quest to have his brother, Francis, appointed Elector for his district (James P. Preston, 1816 Jan 14); misunderstanding during a debate over a bill (James Robertson, 1816 Feb 6); medical advice (Dr. William Southall, 1818 Nov 18); and information about the theft of a young female slave belonging to the overseer of Joseph Cabell, Mr. Poor, supposedly stolen by Johnson alias Smith and the free "Negro" Joe Ligon, whose registry transcription is included with the letter (Colonel Park Street, 1818 Apr 8).
Series II: Correspondence of the Bolling, Cabell and Related Families
The second series of papers consists of the correspondence of members of the Bolling family, the Cabell family, and related families. The papers of the Bolling family, especially those of Colonel William Bolling, Goochland County, Virginia, are most likely found in this collection because William Bolling was a commissioner and agent for the James River & Kanawha Canal Company who collected subscriptions for stock in this company. Joseph C. Cabell was also heavily involved in the company as president.
Folders containing correspondence to members of the Bolling family include several letters from Jane Bolling to her father, William Bolling, while she was visiting in Washington, (Box 6); Sally F. Cabell to her brother and sister-in-law, Philip and Julia Bolling Cabell (Box 8); miscellaneous correspondents to William Bolling arranged alphabetically (Box 10); miscellaneous correspondents to the Bolling family (Box 10); and miscellaneous correspondents to Philip B. Cabell and his wife, Julia Bolling Cabell (Box 10).
Also in this series is considerable correspondence from Sally Faulcon Cocke Brent (1816-1879) to her sister, Ann Blaws Cocke Cabell (1811-1862) consisting of much news about the different families (Box 6), and ten letters from Sally Brent and her husband, Arthur Lee Brent, to her brother-in-law, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (Box 6). Both groups of letters contain some correspondence about their attitudes and activities concerning the Civil War.
Much of the remaining correspondence in this series consists of letters to and from Nathaniel Francis Cabell (1807-1891), his wife, Ann Blaws Cocke Cabell, and their immediate family members. Nathaniel Francis Cabell, who married Anne Blaws Cocke (1811-1862), the daughter of John Hartwell Cocke, in 1831, inherited the Liberty Hall estate in Nelson County, Virginia. He was the son of Nicholas (1780-1809) and Margaret Venable Cabell (1782-1857) and nephew of Joseph C. Cabell.
There are over a hundred letters from Ann Blaws Cocke Cabell to her husband (Box 6) and about eighty from Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his wife (Box 7). This collection also contains about sixty letters from Ann Cabell to her son, Philip Barraud Cabell (Box 6). There are many letters from Elizabeth Nicholas Cabell to her mother, Ann Cabell (Boxes 6-7); Philip B. Cabell to both parents (Box 8); Sally F. Cabell to her father, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (Box 8); William D. Cabell to his in-laws (Box 8); and many letters from Lucy Oliver Cocke, wife of Dr. Cary Charles Cocke, to her sister-in-law, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (Box 9).
Other correspondents writing to Nathaniel Francis Cabell include: Dr. John Grattan Cabell, 1861-1863, chiefly about the Civil War and the sale of a slave, Lewis, December 3, [1862?](Box 7); Mary W. Cabell, chiefly about borrowing books and the New Jerusalem Church doctrine (Box 7); H.H. Hite dealing with the depredations experienced in Virginia during the Civil War and Reconstruction and being cut off from the Northern brethren of the New Jerusalem Church because of the conflict (Box 10); Benjamin H. Magruder, Scottsville, Virginia, about the sale of property (Box 10); Cabell’s cousin, Ella Floyd Mosby, chiefly about borrowing books and the New Jerusalem Church doctrine (Box 10); and Judge Francis Nathaniel Watkins (1813-1885), Farmville, Virginia, about the destruction of the Civil War, old times, religious ideas, and genealogical questions (Box 11). An obituary for Watkins can be found at the end of his letters.
Nathaniel Francis Cabell writes to his cousin, Isaac Read, discussing the loss of his wife and other family members (1862 May, 1864 May 7) and other family troubles, and his remarriage to Mary M. Kellar, of Baltimore, Maryland (1867 Oct). Cabell also describes the centennial of his school, Hampden Sidney College (1876 Aug 16) to Read (Box 8).
The correspondence of Isaac Read to Cabell can be found in Box 11. These letters discuss the issue of slavery and the sectional strife of the country (1855 Dec 9; 1860 Jun 18; 1861 Feb 10), the Civil War service of Read’s sons (1861 Sep 6); the death of General Philip St. George Cocke (1862 Jan 1); the progress and destructions of the Civil War (all letters 1861-1865); Reconstruction politics (1867 Oct 16; 1868 Mar 4); his move to Brooklyn, New York, to live with his oldest son, partially to avoid the problems of Reconstruction and the utter ruin of the South (1872-1984); the location of each of his sons (1874 Sep 27; 1875 Jan 31, including ideas about the Beecher scandal; 1876 Jun 12); and his preparation for death.
Correspondence from Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his father-in-law, John Hartwell Cocke (Box 7), is concerned with the building of his house on the Liberty Hall estate, references to family slaves, agricultural advice and questions, and the business of the James River & Kanawha Canal Company. Cabell also discusses his belief and involvement in the New Jerusalem Church. For an example, see the letter from N.F. Cabell to Cocke, dated July 29, 1840. He also discusses the temperance issue, the affairs of the University of Virginia, the Sprague and Delavan controversy (1842 Apr 11), and his progress in agriculture.
Correspondence from John Hartwell Cocke to his son-in-law, Nathaniel Francis Cabell can be found in Box 9. Topics in these letters include: advice about the operation of Cabell’s plantation; work on his house; the urgency of road improvement in their areas; the evils of alcohol, especially among the Irish and German laborers (1836 May 30) and the questions about use of wine in communion (1837 Feb 24); the progress of the James River and Kanawha Canal Company (1836 Dec 20; 1842 Oct 10); theological arguments (1837 Mar 26); a prescription for epilepsy (1839 Jul 19); and Cocke’s opinion of Swedenborgism (1840 Aug 21).
Other topics include: an admonition to Cabell to change himself from "a reading man to a working man" in order to save his plantation and make it a paying affair (1840 Dec 3; 1841 Oct 5); advances in the temperance movement (1848 Aug-1849 Jul); notice that one vacancy may be available in Cocke’s school and a list of slaves with their ages from his register (1850 Sep 4 and 30); the presidential election, the Maine Law, and request for N.F. Cabell’s opinion of Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852 Nov 5); Cocke’s opinion of a book on slavery called The Impending Crisis by Hinton Rowan Helper, 1829-1909, (1857 Oct 2); and his attempt to find out if Philip B. Cabell has accepted the position as military aid to Philip St. George Cocke (1861 Aug 20).
Letters from Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his son, Philip Barraud Cabell, in the first folder were chiefly written while Philip was being educated at the school at Bremo, Fluvanna County, and then at the University of Virginia, 1853-1857 and are full of admonishment and fatherly advice. The second folder contains letters during the Civil War period, 1861-1863, one mentioning the condition of the slaves at the hospital in Richmond (1863 Oct 28), and other letters to Philip after he had moved to Urbana, Ohio, to teach at the Urbana University in 1875. Among these is a letter about the sale of the Laneville estate, located about a mile below Warminster, Nelson County, Virginia, and the troubles of the family (1875 Oct 5).
Many of the letters of Philip B. Cabell were written to his parents while he was away from home for educational purposes. There are also letters written during the Civil War in the second folder of his correspondence, describing his military service as a volunteer aid to General Philip St. George Cocke (see time of service document, Oct 1861).
The interest of Nathaniel Francis Cabell in the writings of Emanuel Swendenborg and the New Jerusalem Church, in which he was baptized in 1842 by the Reverend Richard De Charms of Baltimore, Maryland, is illustrated in this collection by his correspondence with and about the Reverend George Bush (Boxes 6 and 8) and with the Reverend Richard De Charms (Boxes 8 and 9). There are also some news clippings about George Bush and some manuscripts and notes about the New Jerusalem Church in the third series of papers (Box 12). Cabell was also interested in John Randolph of Roanoke and there is one folder of letters from him to miscellaneous correspondents about Randolph (Box 8).

Organization
This collection is arranged in three series: 1) Correspondence of Joseph C. Cabell (Boxes 1-5); 2) Correspondence of the Bolling, Cabell and Related families (Boxes 6-11); and 3) Legal, Financial and Miscellaneous Papers (Boxes 11-12). The family had bundled the correspondence chiefly by correspondent name and this arrangement has been refined and preserved.


Biographical Notes
Nicholas Cabell (1750-1803), "Liberty Hall," Nelson County, Virginia, married Hannah Carrington Cabell (1751-1817) in 1772, and had the following children:
1) William H. Cabell (1772- 1853) m. Elizabeth Cabell (d. 1801) in 1795 and
m. Agnes S.B. Gamble in 1805
2) Dr. George Cabell (1774-1827) m. Susanna Wyatt (d.1817) in 1798 and
m. Eliza Fitzhugh May (1794-1859)
3) Elizabeth Cabell (1776-1802) m. Dr. William B. Hare (1760-1818) in 1793
4) Joseph Carrington Cabell (1778-1856) m. Mary Walker Carter (d.1863) in 1807
5) Nicholas Cabell, Jr. (1780-1809) m. Margaret Read Venable (1782-1857) in 1802
6) Mary Anne Cabell (1783-1850) m. Captain Benjamin Carrington (1768-1838) in 1804
7) Mayo Carrington Cabell (1784 Aug-1784 Sep)
8) Hannah Cabell (1786-1794)
9) Heningham Cabell (1787-1794)
10) Paul C. Cabell (1791 May-1791 June)
Nathaniel Francis Cabell (1807-1891), son of Nicholas and Margaret Venable Cabell, married Anne Blaws Cocke (1811-1862), daughter of John Hartwell Cocke, in 1831. He married Mary M. Kellar of Baltimore in 1867. Anne Cocke and N.F. Cabell had the following children:
1) Frances Hartwell Cabell (1833-1844)
2) Elizabeth Nicholas Cabell (1834-1863) m. in 1855, her cousin, William D. Cabell
3) Philip Barraud Cabell (1836- ) m. in 1861, Julia Calvert Bolling ("Pinkie"), daughter of Thomas and Mary Louisa Morris Bolling; during the Civil War, he served on the staff of his uncle, General Philip St. George Cocke, C.S.A.
4) Sallie Faulcon Cabell
5) Frances Grace Cabell (1852- ) m. in 1876, her cousin, R. Kenna Campbell
6) Cary Charles Cabell (1854-1856)

Acquisition Information
The papers were given to the University of Virginia Library by Robert Self, Wingina, Virginia, on January 18, 2001.
PAPERS OF THE JOSEPH C. CABELL FAMILYSERIES I: CORRESPONDENCE OF JOSEPH C. CABELL

BOX 1

1850-1854 Edward Carrington Cabell (1816-1896) to his uncle, Joseph C. Cabell (6 items)
1806-1817 Mrs. Hannah Carrington Cabell (1751-1817) to her son, Joseph C. and Mary C. Cabell (2 folders, 65 items)
1851-1855 Dr. John Grattan Cabell to his uncle, Joseph C. Cabell (6 items)
1810-1848 Joseph C. Cabell (1778-1856) to John Hartwell Cocke (1870-1866) (5 folders, 175 items)

BOX 2


1800-1822 Joseph C. Cabell to Isaac A. Coles (2 folders, 29 items)
1846-1855, n.d. Joseph C. Cabell to his nephew, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (2 folders, 155 items)
1801-1802 Joseph C. Cabell to his parents, Nicholas (1750-1803) and Hannah Carrington Cabell, including one letter to his brother, Dr. George Cabell (6 items)
1807-1819 Joseph C. Cabell to Judge St. George Tucker (1775-1861) (4 items)
1817-1827 Joseph C. Cabell to William Wirt (5 items)
1808-1832 Landon Cabell to Joseph C. Cabell (5 items)
1837-1855 Dr. Robert G. Cabell to his uncle, Joseph C. Cabell (11 items)
1802-1821 William H. Cabell to his brother, Joseph C. Cabell (4 folders, 169 items)

BOX 3

1822-1850 William H. Cabell to his brother, Joseph C. Cabell (6 folders, 132 items)
1821-1822 Dr. George Callaway to Joseph C. Cabell (5 items)
1828-1839 Mathew Carey to Joseph C. Cabell (11 items)
1808-1839 John Coalter to Joseph C. Cabell, including three letters from Cabell in reply (3 folders, 50 items)

BOX 4

1807-1855 John Hartwell Cocke to Joseph C. Cabell, including two letters from Mrs. A.B. Cocke to Mrs. Mary Cabell (9 folders, 199 items)
1802-1832 Isaac A. Coles to Joseph C. Cabell (2 folders, 40 items)

BOX 5

1824-1847, n.d. Mayo Cabell to Joseph C. Cabell (4 items)
1822-1832 Malcolm F. Crawford to Joseph C. Cabell (5 items)
1815-1819 William J. Lewis (1766-1828) to Joseph C. Cabell (6 items)
1802-1832 Thomas S. McLelland (1777-1835) to Joseph C. Cabell (16 items)
1809-1851 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: B-C, including: Thomas Brown (1809); Apsley Butler (1823); Dr. George Cabell (1815); Julia M. Cabell (1851); Mary Cabell, wife of Joseph Cabell (1821); Patrick H. Cabell (1825); Samuel Campbell (1822); James Caskie (1850); Mrs. Louisa Cocke (1827); James P. Cocke (1811); William E. Cunningham (1836); Robert N. Crittenden (1849, 2 items)
1810-1840 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: D-G, including: Thomas R. Dew, 1802-1846, (1837-1838, 3 items); William H. Digges (1836); Thomas Dobson, Philadelphia bookbinder (1817, 3 items); Robert W. [Elsom?] (1840); John W. Greene (1810)
1811-1837 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: H, including: John Hall (1815); John W. Harris (1837); Edmund Harrison (1811-1819, 3 items); James Harrison (1814): Randolph Harrison (1811-1819, 3 items); James E. Heath (1831-1834, 3 items); William C. Holt (1823); Thomas C. Hoomes (1818-1821, 2 items); General John P. Hungerford (1811)
1807-1850 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: L-M, including: Samuel Leake (1828); Mrs. Paulina LeGrand (1815-1816, 2 items); Thomas Massie (1814, 1825, 1834, 4 items); Charles F. Mercer (1820, 1833); Hugh Mercer (1807, 1829, 2 items); John Millington (1836); Garritt Minor (1832, 2 items); William M. Moody (1834); Charles L. Mosby (1837, 1850, 3 items)

1808-1854 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: N-P, including: Judge William Nelson (1809-1810, 2 items); Wilson C. Nicholas (1808, 1820, 2 items); Thomas Ogle, carriage maker (1810); T. Oldham (1849); Reuben B. Patterson (1833); Lukens Pierce (1854); Colonel Charles Perrow (1835); William B. Phillips (1825); James Pleasants (1822, includes an enclosure from Governor Dickerson concerning a flax breaking machine); John P. Pleasants (1810); Samuel Pleasants (1813); James P. Preston (1816); General John Preston (1814)
1814-1851 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: R-S, including: Archibald Ritchie (1822); James Robertson, with copy of a draft from Cabell (1816, 1818, 3items); Merritt M. Robinson (1831); Sankay & Street (1832); James W. Saunders (1850); Robert G. Scott (1835-1836, 2 items); R.J. Smith, Richmond bookseller (1833); Dr. William Southall (1818); George W. Spooner (1851); John Stokely (1814); Colonel Park Street (1818)
1807-1850 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: T, including: John Taliaferro (1829, address leaf only); R.L. Taliaferro (1829); Cephas Thompson (1811); R.B. Townley (1850); Beverley Tucker (1807); George Tucker (1824); Henry W. Tucker (1826); N. B. Tucker (1838, 2 items)
1801-1835 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Joseph C. Cabell: U-Y, including: John D. Urquhart (1829); D.B. Warden (1833); James Webster (1819); Thomas H. White (1835); Thomas W. White (1831-1832, 3 items); Bennett Wright (1833); David Yancey (1801)
1808-1832 Robert Rives to Joseph C. Cabell (14 items)
1800-14, 1834-38 Henry St. George Tucker to Joseph C. Cabell (20 items)
1810-1836 Charles Yancey to Joseph C. Cabell (24 items)

SERIES II: CORRESPONDENCE OF THE CABELL AND RELATED FAMILIES

BOX 6

1845 Jane Bolling to her father, William Bolling (6 items)
1837, 1856-1862, n.d. Sally F. Cocke Brent to Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (3 folders, 154 items)
1834-1865 Sally F. Cocke Brent and Arthur Lee Brent to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (10 items)
1845-1859, n.d. The Reverend George Bush (1796-1859) to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (47 items)
1832-1861, n.d Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell to her husband, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (2 folders, 115 items)
1846-1861, n.d. Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell to her son, Philip B. Cabell (60 items)
1852-1857 Elizabeth Nicholas Cabell to her mother, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (3 folders, 118 items)

BOX 7
1858-1861, n.d. Elizabeth Nicholas Cabell to her mother, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (4 folders, 218 items)
1843-1856, n.d. Elizabeth Nicholas Cabell to her brother, Philip B. Cabell (35 items)
1861-1863 Dr. John Grattan Cabell to his cousin, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (11 items)
1866-1874 Mary W. Cabell to her cousin, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (9 items)
1831-1848, n.d. Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his wife, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (82 items)
1834-1848, n.d. Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his father-in-law, John Hartwell Cocke (2 folders, 86 items)
1846-63, 1875-86, n.d. Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his son, Philip B. Cabell (2 folders, 103 items)

BOX 8

1838-1860, n.d. Nathaniel Francis Cabell to the Reverend Richard De Charms (2 folders, 87 items)
1831-1881 Nathaniel Francis Cabell to Miscellaneous Correspondents, including drafts (27 items)
1868-1878 Nathaniel Francis Cabell to Miscellaneous Correspondents re John Randolph of Roanoke (8 items)
1862-1884 Nathaniel Francis Cabell to his cousin, Isaac Read (15 items)
1845-1872 Nathaniel Francis Cabell and Miscellaneous Correspondents, writing to or about the Reverend George Bush (19 items)
1843-52, 1859-83 Philip B. Cabell to his parents, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell and Nathaniel Francis Cabell (2 folders, 186 items)
1850-1887 Sally F. Cabell to her brother and sister-in-law, Philip and Julia Bolling Cabell (45 items)
1861-1863 Sally F. Cabell to her father, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (17 items)
1855-1865, n.d. William D. Cabell to his in-laws, Nathaniel Francis Cabell and Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (32 items)
1865-1875 William D. Cabell to his brother-in-law, Philip B. Cabell (31 items)
1833-1862 Cary Charles Cocke to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (29 items)

BOX 9

1835-1861 John Hartwell Cocke to his son-in-law, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (4 folders, 109 items)
1843-1853 John Hartwell Cocke to his grandson, Philip B. Cabell (44 items)
1831-1835 John Hartwell Cocke, Jr. to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (16 items)
1833-1840 Louisa Cocke to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (7 items)
1840-1861, n.d. Lucy Oliver Cocke, wife of Dr. C.C. Cocke, to her sister-in-law, Anne Blaws Cocke Cabell (3 folders, 152 items)
1834-1860 Philip St. George Cocke to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (31 items)
1838-1860, n.d. The Reverend Richard De Charms (1796-1864) to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (2 folders, 79 items)

BOX 10

1865-1882, n.d. H.H. Hite to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (19 items)
1836-1838 Benjamin H. Magruder to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (5 items)
1840-1845 Miscellaneous Correspondents to William Bolling: A-E, including: [William Segar Archer?]; his daughter, M.L. Bolling; P.A. Bolling; his son, Thomas Bolling; Charles L. Botts; John M. Botts (circular letter); Frederick Boyden; General Alexander Brown; the Reverend John Cole; the Reverend N.H. Cobb (2 items); John H. Cocke (3 items); Deborah M. Couch (4 items); George P. Crump; Dr. [John?] Curd; Thomas Duke; R. Edmond; Charles Ellis; Thomas H. Ellis
1843-1845 Miscellaneous Correspondents to William Bolling: F-H, including: James Fenton; Alexander Garrett (2 items); Edward Gay (4 items); N.B. Gay; Charles Gennet (3 items); Dr. Harris; Lucy G. Harris; Mrs. H.C. Harrison; Martha Hoy; William H. Hubbard; Captain E.A. Huntley
1843-1844 Miscellaneous Correspondents to William Bolling: J-P, including: Ch. Johnson; Howel L. Kent; James Lyons; C.H. McCormick; the Reverend James McElroy; Heath Jones Miller; Nunnally Lawson; the Reverend Edward W. Peet; General [J.W.] Pegram
1836-1845 Miscellaneous Correspondents to William Bolling: R-S, including: Charles Radziminski (3 items); R.B. Randolph; Richard Randolph; William B. Randolph; Richard Reins; Ann Rice; Wyndham Robertson (3 items); Anthony Robertson, Jr.; Mrs. Skipwith (invitation); Robert Skipwith; John C. Stratton
1842-1844 Miscellaneous Correspondents to William Bolling: T-W, including: [J.M.] Trevillian; Warwick & Barksdale; Joseph K. Weisiger (2 items); Whig Committee of Richmond; Mrs. Helen Wilmer (2 items); the Reverend J.P.B. Wilmer (3 items); the Reverend R.H. Wilmer
1823-1880 Miscellaneous Correspondents to the Bolling Family (7 items)
1832-1871 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Nathaniel Francis Cabell: A-B, including: W.H.A.; the Reverend H. Alexander; Annie Arthur; C.Ashford; Dr. D.C. Barraud; Otway B. Barraud; John Roy Baylor; William M. Blackford; Professor Walter Blair (4 items); Colonel William Boulware; Robert L. Brown; John R. Bryan (2 items)
1836-1883 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Nathaniel Francis Cabell: C, including: Alice Winston Cabell; C. Cabell; Fannie Grace Cabell (3 items); Dr. J.L. Cabell; J.L. Cabell; John Breckinridge Cabell; Julia Bolling Cabell (6 items); Mrs. Margaret C. Cabell; Mayo Cabell (3 items); Nannie Cabell (2 items); P.H. Cabell; P.C. Callaway; Judge John A. Campbell; Mrs. E.V. Carrington; Dr. William A. Carrington (5 items); John B. Cocke (2 items); W.R.C. Cocke; L.D. Crenshaw
1846-1873 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Nathaniel Francis Cabell: E-H, including: Augusta Edmonds (4 items); Robert Edmonds; Professor P.A. Emery; Thomas H. Farrar; Mrs. Alice Mosby Gardner, (1836-?) (2 items); John Harris; M.B. Harris; William B. Harrison; William H. Harrison (5 items); E.H. Hartsook; E.R. Hester (2 items); Isaac Irvine Hite; the Reverend Joseph Holdrich (4 items); Mrs. Alfred Hughes (2 items); John N. Humes (2 items); J.W. Leadenham (2 items); Daniel H. London (4 items); J.B. McClelland; M.L. McClelland; Thomas S. McClelland; Virginia P. Mosby (2 items); Lucie B. Palmer (2 items); B.E. Payne; James S. Penn; T. Benjamin Perkins; Joseph R. Putnam

1838-1885 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Nathaniel Francis Cabell: R-Y, including: J.W. Randolph; C.C. Read (5 items); Evelyn C. Robinson (2 items); M.M. Robinson; Edmund Ruffin (2 items); Frank G. Ruffin; Nannie Russell; Minna Scott; Miles T. Shipman; Robert Skipwith; the Reverend B.M. Smith; N.M. Thomas; Samuel S. Thompson; Marion Tyree; Mrs. E.A. Upshur (2 items); R.L. Walker; the Reverend S.W. Watkins; H.N.B. Wood; Miss S.D. Woods; William H. Wyckoff (2 items); Charles Yancey (2 items)
1844-1894 Miscellaneous Correspondents to Philip B. Cabell and Julia Bolling Cabell (16 items)
1841-1896 Miscellaneous Correspondents to the Cabell and related Families (34 items)
1864-1881 Ella Floyd Mosby (1846-?) to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (19 items)

BOX 11

1824-1887, n.d. Isaac Read to his cousin, Nathaniel Francis Cabell (38 items)
1854-1885 Francis Nathaniel Watkins to Nathaniel Francis Cabell (39 items)

SERIES III: LEGAL and FINANCIAL AND MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS

ca. 1832-1866 Legal and Financial Papers (10 items)
1816-1843 Legal and Financial Papers – Estate of Thomas Bolling (25 items)
1783-1860, n.d. Legal and Financial Papers – William Bolling (3 folders, 211 items)
1835-1845 Legal and Financial Papers – James River and Kanawha Company, including Correspondence of Joseph C. Cabell and William Bolling (24 items)

BOX 12


1818-1844 Legal and Financial Papers – Estate of James Lownes (30 items)
ca. 1817-1838 Legal and Financial Papers – Estates of William Newburn, Sarah R. Newburn and William C.R. Newburn, with William Bolling Executor (4 folders, 141 items)
ca. 1879, n.d. Manuscripts and Notes by Nathaniel Francis Cabell (9 items)
1825-1843, n.d. News clippings (49 items)
1844-1848, n.d. News clippings re Professor George Bush (33 items)
n.d. Poetry Manuscripts (12 items)
ca. 1861 Jul Report on the First Battle of Bull Run (incomplete draft)
1862-1863, n.d. School Reports and Miscellaneous Papers, including notes by Philip B. Cabell about the resurrection of Jesus Christ (11 items)

Sharon Defibaugh
Jaime Lawson, Heather Baker
2002 October 17




University of Virginia Library
PO Box 400113, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4113
ph: (434) 924-3021, fax: (434) 924-1431, library@virginia.edu

Text Version    |   Libraries   |   Depts./Contacts   |  U.Va. Home   |   ITC

Website Feedback   |   Search   |   Questions? Ask a Librarian   |   Hours   |   Map   |   Policies   |   Jobs

Tracking Opt-out    |   © by the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia

Federal Library Depository logo  This library is a Congressionally designated depository for U.S. Government documents. Public access to the Government documents is guaranteed by public law.